Susan Edwards: Myth, Magic and Wonder 15


DISCOVERIES

A couple days ago, I redesigned my banner for my website and sent it to my son who designed my website.  I loved what I did but knew he’d find fault.  After all, he is a programmer, which makes pleasing his sensibilities with my creativity nearly impossible.  And <sigh>, I was right.  He vetoed most of what I did.  I have to wonder what happened to that creative little boy who along with his younger sister helped me discover my own creative writing talent.

You see, I was not always a writer, unlike so many authors who say they’ve always loved writing.  Me?  I never wanted to write anything, except maybe chatty letters to friends or my great-grandmother (who loved receiving mail) or notes to pals in class.  Okay, I’ve dated myself here because I grew up without computers, emails, social media or text messages!

I also absolutely hated writing, did not excel in English and thought history the most boring subject on earth!  So it’s rather strange and ironic that not only am I a writer but I’ve published 12 historical romances.  Well, back to my beginnings.

When my son was in grade school, his teachers were very impressed with his writing and his creative storytelling.  Same thing happened with my daughter.  Both kids were very creative and did very well at writing and telling stories.  I was mystified but glad they enjoyed the writing experience.  Of course, we as a family were big readers so I figured that helped.

In that same time period, I was reading historicals.  Mostly Native American/Westerns.  And I was getting bored with what was out there and had read most of what appealed to me.  Why wasn’t there more of what I want to read?  It was very frustrating.  At the same time, I had an idea for a story playing in my head.

And here it comes for you see, I had two things going for me that led to my current writing career. First and foremost, I was, and still am, an avid reader of romance (write what you know). Second, I am a natural-born storyteller.  I remember using my dolls and stuffed animals and creating stories and “situations” for them.  As I grew up, my need for storytelling did not go away.  I had stories in my head day and night.

However, I did not write them down or tell them to others.  My stories were in my mind.  I created them, scene by scene.  I rewrote them then went back to individual scenes and rewrote again and again until I was satisfied.  Once a “story” was perfected, another story would take shape and the process would repeat.  Many times, an old story would return with the clarity of story in a book.  I could “re-read” it and make changes.

Of course, I figured I was just an incurable daydreamer.  My teachers and parents certainly thought so.  It wasn’t until I was in my 40’s and had already sold my first book that I discovered that my daydreaming was actually storytelling!  All the elements we writers require for our books were in my dream worlds.  I had the good guys, the bad guys, the conflict, the black moment and the happy-ever-after.

Does all this sound like a writer? Yep.  So this little story of my road to becoming a published author starts when I was married with two young children in the late 80’s as I consumed books about strong heroines and handsome warriors like an ocean swallowing a beach! One day, in my typical “daydreaming” or “story creation mode”, I came up with a heroine who meets a young, virile hero at stream. Hero was Native American and this “story” kept intruding on my thoughts–more so than normal.   Also, I could not move this story forward to “the end”.

It was very strange as I could see these two characters so clearly: she was running away from an evil uncle, and my hero was a troubled young warrior. Before I knew it I had a nice little scene going of these two people so in love and so right for each other.  And it was the perfect place to put them into a nice hot love scene.

But something was wrong.  First, this couple wanted more from me.  They were so insistent that I did something I’d never done before:   I took them out of my head and gave them life on paper (good thing I had a computer by this time).  Okay, I thought. I’ll write a nice, steamy love scene. I could see it, feel it, so no problem, right?

Wrong! Before I could write about these two people falling in love and having their happily-ever-after, I had to know more about them.

  • Why was my heroine alone in the wilderness?
  • Why was she fleeing her uncle? What did he want and how bad did he want it?
  • What troubled my warrior and why was he in the same vicinity as my heroine?
  • Why was he drawn to my heroine aside from her blonde hair? Why her and only her?
  • Was he willing to risk it all for her?

Before I knew what hit me, I had four chapters of back story.  I was shocked.  But it couldn’t possible be any good.  So I gave it to a couple of people to read.  One of my closest friends looked at me after she finished those chapters with awe in her face (I still remember that look) and she said two words that sealed my future:  Finish It.

The rest they say is history! The writer within was set free and an author was born!

I choose this topic for this blog because I never, ever considered writing to be a hidden talent.  I would have loved to see the looks on some of my old teachers, and my past English teachers faces as I’m pretty sure (as sure as there is always death and taxes in life) that none of them would have predicted that I would become a writer, let along published.

And perhaps things would have been different had I not listened to that inner voice telling me to step out of my comfort zone and put that first story down on paper.  Yes, it was scary to let others read it, and see what went through my mind.  But it was well worth it for I made an amazing discover about myself.

The path I set upon started with committing a story to paper.  But that was only one step of the process (aside from letting others read it).  It took me 3 years to finish the story between all the aspects of life, husband and children.  Add another 4 years of writing and rewriting and learning the craft of writing and submitting and getting rejection after rejection before an editor asked for a full manuscript. Add another year before I had my first offer, then yet another year before that first book, White Wind was on the bookshelves in 1996. Nine years total!   Wow!

It’s now about 15 years later and once again I’m anticipating seeing my first book hit the shelves with a new cover in its new digital format with Carina Press. The excitement and anticipation is the same, as is the worry–will readers like my baby! Some things do not change!

So in retelling this story, it is my hope that someone reading this makes a self-discovery of their own.

♦  Are you harboring a writer within? If so, what are you doing about it? I’d love to hear your “writer within” stories.

♦   Have you discovered a hidden talent during your adult years?  If so, what and how do you feel about it.

♦   Have you discovered something about yourself through your children?

♦   What do you read, why and how does that genre make you feel?

I would love to read your comments and hear of your own discoveries.  I can’t begin to list the many things I’ve discovered about myself since those awful school days and guess what?  It doesn’t stop.  The list just continues to grow as we grow.

Add your comments and I’ll enter you into a contest for a free copy of White Dawn in epub format.

Check out my website:   http://susanedwards.com  for excerpts and reviews on my White Series and news of upcoming releases.  The first 4 books in this series is out Nov. 21st.  I also have contests going on-info for that is currently being updated.  Check back this weekend.

Preorder your copy in E-Format at the following sites:

White Dawn
Carina Press
Amazon Kindle
Barnes & Noble Nook
White Dusk
Carina Press
Amazon Kindle
Barnes & Noble Nook
White Shadows
Carina Press
Amazon Kindle
Barnes & Noble Nook
White Wind
Carina Press
Amazon Kindle
Barnes & Noble Nook


15 thoughts on “Susan Edwards: Myth, Magic and Wonder

  • Toni Anderson

    Susan, I’m so excited to share a release week with your beautiful books and I loved reading your amazing story.

    Have you discovered something about yourself through your children?
    Lord,yes. I’m an impatient lunatic who can actually scream at little people. 🙂 Something else? Hmmm… Something nice? I don’t think so. I was much nicer and much stupider without children. I wouldn’t swap them for anything and I’d fight to the death for them though. They made me realize my capacity for emotion was much greater than I had ever assumed. Having kids is like unlocking a door inside you and nothing is ever the same again 🙂 Good luck. Wishing you many sales 🙂

  • Kathy Ivan

    Congratulations on rereleasing your stories. What a wonderful feeling. I was a “late bloomer” too, didn’t start seriously writing until a few years ago.

  • Shelley Munro

    What an inspirational story, Susan. I think that often we’re our own worst enemies, frightened to take a step in case we fall. I always wanted to write, but with me it was a case of stopping talking/thinking about it and actually doing it. Like you, I got there finally.

    All the best with your rerelease and the ones coming during the next few months.

  • Julie Rowe

    I was a late starter too. My first career was as a med lab tech. People still find it hard to believe I started out as a science geek, but now write romance novels. I wouldn’t change a thing though!

    Congrats on your four releases!

  • Cathy Pegau

    Like you, Susan, I was telling stories long before I sat down to write. First as a kid, lulling myself to sleep. Then as a teen in a D&D roleplaying group, where half our “dungeons” were talking about other actions our characters took between adventures. Including relationships 😉 I didn’t start writing until my oldest was a toddler, 12 years ago, so I’m one of those late bloomers too, I guess 🙂

    Congrats on the releases, and many happy sales to you!

  • Rachael Johns

    Harbouring the writer within? What a fabulous term. I discovered I was harbouring a writer after breaking up with my first boyfriend and starting to write our story. Sad… but it led me to a fabulous new life 🙂

  • Kay Keppler

    Congratulations on your releases, Susan! That’s so thrilling. Like many of us, I, too, have a writer harboring within. Mostly, though, she likes to take naps…

  • Susan Edwards

    What wonderful comments! I wonder if so many writers are “late bloomers” because we need to gain some life experience in order to write compelling stories about people, their conflicts and resolutions.

    I also agree that children change you forever and its up to us whether it is for the better or worse.

    thanks for the wonderful comments! Drawing will be on Friday

  • Shawna Thomas

    Hi Susan,

    Thank you for sharing your path to publication. (I almost said writerhood, but…) ; ) I think daydreaming is one of the best things a writer can do, and one of my favorite parts of the creative process.

    I am so looking forward to reading more of your work!

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